Mar 4, 2014

Posted by in asides, Blog, Featured Articles | 29 Comments

Según calendario judío estamos a 1 mes de los 6000 años.(año espiritual)

Share Button

 

 

 

      SEGUN EL CALENDARIO JUDIO SE LE DEBE AGREGAR CADA DOS AÑOS UN MES EXTRA EL MES 13.PORQUE SU CALENDARIO TIENE SOLO 30 DIAS CADA MES.

ESTAMOS SOLO A UN MES DEL MES DE NISAN O ABID.Y DE ENTRAR EN LOS 6000 AÑOS.

 

.

-

Determining the Hebrew Hour

A Hebrew Hour is defined as 1/12 of the time between sunset and sunrise, or 1/12 of the time betweensunrise and sunset. The only Scriptural reference to there being 12 Hebrew Hours in a Hebrew Day is found inJohn 11:9 where  יהושע the Messiah asked a famous question, “Are there not 12 hours in a day?” The diagram below is a working timepiece where the sun’s position indicates the current Hebrew Hour at Jerusalem. One Hebrew Hour ends and another begins when the center of the sun crosses an hour line.

Live Jerusalem Time

Mid

Day

1st
Hour

2nd
Hour

3rd
Hour

4th
Hour

5th
Hour

6th
Hour

7th
Hour

8th
Hour

9th
Hour

10th
Hour

11th
Hour

12th
Hour

Mid

Night

1st
Hour

2nd
Hour

3rd
Hour

4th
Hour

5th
Hour

6th
Hour

7th
Hour

8th
Hour

9th
Hour

10th
Hour

11th
Hour

12th
Hour

First
Watch

Second
Watch

Third
Watch

Fourth
Watch

00:28:23

until next Hebrew Hour

04:36:00
until Sunrise
Currently in Jerusalem it is:
Yom Re-vi-i – 4th Day of the Week
Day 3, Month 13, Year 5999
Eighth Hour – Third Watch of the Night
(A Hebrew Night Hour is 01:01:54 today)
(Duration of this Hebrew Day: 24:00:45)

This live time clock shows the current Scriptural Hebrew Hour in Jerusalem based on the instantaneous position of the sun as it would be seen there. The dark area represents Night, and the light area represents Day. As the sun’s disk moves in a clockwise motion, the current Hebrew Hour is indicated. One Hebrew Hour ends and another Hebrew Hour begins at the moment the center of the sun’s disk crosses an hour line. The Night Watches for the Age of the Messiah are also shown.

The Torah, the Prophets and the Writings do not number specific Hebrew Hours. Only the Messianic Scriptures number specific Hebrew Hours in Matthew, Mark, Luke and Acts. The third hour of the day is referred to inMatthew 20:3-4Mark 15:25 and Acts 2:15. The third hour of the night is referred to in Acts 23:23-24. Thesixth hour of the day is referred to in Matthew 20:527:45Mark 15:33Luke 23:44 and Acts 10:9. The ninth hour of the day is referred to in Matthew 20:527:4527:46Mark 15:3315:34Luke 23:44Acts 3:1Acts 10:3 and Acts 10:30-31. The eleventh hour of the day is referred to in Matthew 20:6 and Matthew 20:9.

A Typical Hebrew Day

One Hebrew Day

Genesis 1:5 Elohim called the light Day and the darkness He called Night.
And there was Evening and there was Morning - Day One.

12 Hours

John 11:9 Are there not
12 hours in a day?

First
Watch

Second
Watch

Third
Watch

Fourth
Watch

Sunset

Evening

“Twinkling of an eye”
Night Begins

Sunrise

Morning

Sunset

Evening

Evening
Twilight

“Twinkling of an eye”
Night Begins

Morning
Twilight

Between the
Evenings

בין הערבים

(Evening Twilight)

1

1

2

2

3

3

4

4

5

5

6

6

7

7

8

8

9

9

10

10

11

11

12

12

Mid-day

Hebrew Day Hours

Mid-night

Hebrew Night Hours

A Hebrew Day consists of 12 Hebrew Night Hours and 12 Hebrew Day Hours. The midpoint of the 12 Hebrew Night Hours is called Mid-night. The moment of Mid-night occurs exactly halfway between sunset and sunrise separating the sixth and seventh Hebrew Night Hours. The midpoint of the 12 Hebrew Day Hours is called Mid-day. The moment of Mid-day occurs exactly halfway between sunrise and sunset separating the sixth and seventh Hebrew Day Hours. An easy way to measure Day Hours is by using an equiangular sundial marked with 12 divisions.

In the Creation Calendar, Hebrew Hours begin at sunrise and sunset. A Hebrew Hour occurring between sunsetand sunrise is called a Hebrew Night Hour. A Hebrew Hour occurring between sunrise and sunset is called aHebrew Day HourSunset occurs and the First Watch begins exactly at the beginning of the first Hebrew Night Hour. The Second Watch begins exactly at the beginning of the fourth Hebrew Night Hour. Mid-nightoccurs and the Third Watch begins exactly at the beginning of the seventh Hebrew Night Hour. The Fourth Watch begins exactly at the beginning of the tenth Hebrew Night Hour, and ends at sunrise at the end of thetwelfth Hebrew Night Hour. Sunrise is always exactly at the beginning of the first Hebrew Day Hour. Mid-dayoccurs exactly at the end of the sixth Hebrew Day Hour. Sunset occurs exactly at the end of the twelfthHebrew Day Hour.

The duration of a Hebrew Hour varies with the season. A Hebrew Day Hour is shorter in duration during winterwhen a Hebrew Night Hour is longer in duration. A Hebrew Day Hour is longer in duration during summer when a Hebrew Night Hour is shorter in duration.

A Short Hebrew Day in Winter

One Hebrew Day 

First
Watch

Second
Watch

Third
Watch

Fourth
Watch

12 Hours

Sunset

Evening

Sunrise

Morning

Sunset

Evening

1

1

2

2

3

3

4

4

5

5

6

6

7

7

8

8

9

9

10

10

11

11

12

12

Mid-day

Hebrew Day Hours

Mid-night

Hebrew Night Hours

In this diagram, a Hebrew Day Hour is shorter in duration than a Hebrew Night Hour. This occurs in winter. The daytime hours are the shortest on the day of the winter solstice.

A Long Hebrew Day in Summer

One Hebrew Day

First
Watch

Second
Watch

Third
Watch

Fourth
Watch

12 Hours

Sunset

Evening

Sunrise

Morning

Sunset

Evening

1

1

2

2

3

3

4

4

5

5

6

6

7

7

8

8

9

9

10

10

11

11

12

12

Mid-day

Hebrew Day Hours

Mid-night

Hebrew Night Hours

In this diagram, a Hebrew Day Hour is longer in duration than a Hebrew Night Hour. This occurs in summer. The daytime hours are the longest on the day of the summer solstice.

In contrast to Matthew, Mark, Luke and Acts, the book of John, as it now exists in the Greek manuscripts, numbers hours from midnight as the Romans did. Pilate questioned  יהושע the Messiah at the sixth hourRoman reckoning according to John 19:14 which is the twelfth Hebrew Night Hour.  יהושע the Messiah sat at Jacob’s well at Sychar at the sixth hour Roman reckoning after a tiresome journey according to John 4:6which is the twelfth Hebrew Day Hour. A nobleman travelled the better part of a day from Cana to Capernaum and met  יהושע the Messiah at the seventh hour Roman reckoning according to in John 4:52 which is the first Hebrew Night Hour. The disciples came to the place  יהושע the Messiah was staying at the tenth hourRoman reckoning and stayed with Him for the rest of that day according to John 1:39. The tenth hour Roman reckoning is the fourth Hebrew Day Hour.

Although some have claimed there is no historical proof that the Romans counted the hours from midnight, such proof indeed exists. According to Gaius Plinius Secundus who lived between 23 C.E. and 79 C.E., the Roman authorities counted civil hours from midnight.

Pliny the Elder, Natural History 2:77: “The very day itself men have observed in various manners. The Babylonians count the period between the two sunrises, the Athenians that between two sunsets, the Umbrians from midday to midday, the common people everywhere from dawn to dark, the Romanpriests and the authorities who fix the civil day, and also the Egyptians and Hipparchus, the period frommidnight to midnight.”

Today, the Gregorian Calendar counts civil hours from midnight similar to the way the Romans did.

The Watches of the Night

In the Age of Torah the time between sunset and sunrise was divided into three watches. The evening watch is alluded to by Moses in Psalms 90:4.

Psalms 90:4 For a thousand years in Your sight are as one day when it is past, as a watch in the night[the evening watch].

This verse alludes to the fact that one Hebrew Day is past at the moment of sunset when the evening watchbegins. It also alludes to the fact that one millennium ends and another millennium begins at sunset when the evening watch begins. The middle watch of the night is mentioned once in Judges 7:19. The morning watch is referred to by Moses in Exodus 14:24 and is also mentioned in 1 Samuel 11:11.

By the time of the Age of the Messiah, the time between sunset and sunrise was divided into four watches. The second watch and third watch are each mentioned once in Luke 12:38. The fourth watch is mentioned once in Matthew 14:25 and once in Mark 6:48 as the time when the Messiah walked on the water.

Watches During the Ages

One Hebrew Day

Genesis 1:5 Elohim called the light Day and the darkness He called Night.
And there was Evening and there was Morning - Day One.

12 Hours

John 11:9 Are there not
12 hours in a day?

During the Age of Instruction

Evening
Watch

Middle
Watch

Morning
Watch

First
Watch

Second
Watch

Third
Watch

Fourth
Watch

During the Age of the Messiah

Sunset

Evening

“Twinkling of an eye”
Night Begins

Sunrise

Morning

Sunset

Evening

Evening
Twilight

“Twinkling of an eye”
Night Begins

Morning
Twilight

Between the
Evenings

בין הערבים

(Evening Twilight)

1

1

2

2

3

3

4

4

5

5

6

6

7

7

8

8

9

9

10

10

11

11

12

12

Mid-day

Hebrew Day Hours

Mid-night

Hebrew Night Hours

There are always 12 Hebrew Night Hours and 12 Hebrew Day Hours in a Hebrew Day. This diagram represents a typical Hebrew Day in which the duration of both the nighttime and the daytime hours are about the same. This occurs twice a year around the time of the fall equinox and spring equinox.

There are always exactly 24 Hebrew Hours between two sunsets. However, the duration of time between two sunsets measured in civil hoursminutes and seconds changes slightly throughout the year. The curve on the graph below represents the time difference in seconds between 24 civil hours and 24 Hebrew Hours throughout the year at Jerusalem. The blue area represents the period when 24 Hebrew Hours are slightly longer in duration than 24 civil hours. The purple area represents the period when 24 Hebrew Hours are slightly shorter in duration than 24 civil hours. The duration of 24 Hebrew Hours on the Hebrew Day of the spring equinox is24:00:41 or 41 seconds longer than 24 civil hours. The duration of 24 Hebrew Hours on the Hebrew Day of the fall equinox is 23:58:41 or 79 seconds less than 24 civil hours. Notice there is little correlation between the shape of the time variation curve and the seasonal solstices and equinoxes.

The Duration of a Hebrew Day

0
Days

50
Days

100
Days

150
Days

200
Days

250
Days

300
Days

350
Days

+100 Seconds

+50 Seconds

Time Difference in
seconds between
a Hebrew Day of
24 Hebrew Hours
and 24 civil hours

0 Seconds

-50 Seconds

-100 Seconds

winter
solstice

Winter

spring
equinox

Spring

summer
solstice

Summer

fall
equinox

Fall

A Hebrew Day always has exactly 24 Hebrew Hours. A civil day consists of 24 civil hours. However, a Hebrew Day does not always equal 24 civil hours. Since a Hebrew Day is the time from one sunset to the next, its duration will differ from 24 civil hours due to the civil time difference between the two sunset times. The curve on this graph represents the time difference in seconds between a Hebrew Day of 24 Hebrew Hours and a civil day of 24 civil hours throughout the year at Jerusalem.

Accuracy of Sunrise and Sunset Times

Calculations for sunrise and sunset times on torahcalendar.com are based upon certain assumptions made in modeling atmospheric refraction. These assumptions include using the latitude, longitude and elevation of the Temple Mount located in Jerusalem, using a yearly average barometric pressure of 1010 millibars, and using a yearly average air temperature of 19.4°C (66.9°F). Therefore, all times displayed relating to sunrise or sunset which are shown with a resolution in seconds, are determined based upon these atmospheric refraction modeling assumptions.

As Jean Meeus states in Astronomical Algorithms:

“A change of temperature from winter to summer can shift the times of sunrise and sunset by about 20 seconds in mid-northern and mid-southern latitudes. Similarly, observing sunrise or sunset over a range of barometric pressures leads to a variation of a dozen seconds in time.”
Jean Meeus, Astronomical Algorithms, Second Edition, p.101.

“The effect of [atmospheric] refraction increases when the pressure increases or when the [air]temperature decreases.” Jean Meeus, Astronomical Algorithms, Second Edition, p.106.

“Near the horizon unpredictable disturbances of the atmosphere become rather important. According to investigations by Schaefer and Liller, the refraction at the horizon fluctuates by 0.3° around a mean value [34 minutes of arc] normally, and in some cases apparently much more … it should be mentioned here that giving rising or setting times of a celestial body more accurately than to the nearest minute makes no sense.” Jean Meeus, Astronomical Algorithms, Second Edition, p.107.

For these reasons, actual observed sunrise and sunset times at Jerusalem may differ by as much as one minute due to daily variations in temperature and barometric pressure. In winter when the temperature is colder, the actual sunrise may occur earlier than projected times. Also, on a day when the barometric pressure is higher, sunrise may occur earlier. Cold temperature and high barometric pressure combined work cumulatively in causing the sunrise to occur earlier than the projected times. Torahcalendar.com only displays sunrise and sunset times to the nearest second to better illustrate the passage of time while providing a near real-time simulation of these events.

 

 

.
.
TRADUCTOR:
.

La determinación de la hora hebrea
Una hora hebreo se define como 1/12 del tiempo entre la puesta y la salida del sol , o 1/12 del tiempo entre el amanecer y el atardecer. La única referencia bíblica a la existencia de 12 Horas hebreas en un día hebreo se encuentra en Juan 11:09 donde יהושע el Mesías hizo una pregunta famosa : ” ¿Acaso no hay 12 horas en un día ? ” El siguiente diagrama es un reloj de trabajo , donde la posición del sol indica la hora actual hebrea de Jerusalén. Una hora hebrea termina y otra comienza cuando el centro del Sol cruza una línea de hora .

Vive Jerusalén Tiempo
 
medio
día
primero
hora
segundo
hora
tercero
hora
cuarto
hora
quinto
hora
sexto
hora
séptimo
hora
octavo
hora
nono
hora
10a
hora
11
hora
12
hora
medio
noche
primero
hora
segundo
hora
tercero
hora
cuarto
hora
quinto
hora
sexto
hora
séptimo
hora
octavo
hora
nono
hora
10a
hora
11
hora
12
hora
primero
ver
segundo
ver
tercera
ver
cuarto
ver
00:28:23
hasta la próxima hora hebrea
04:36:00 hasta SunriseCurrently en Jerusalén que es :
Yom Re -vi -i – cuarto día de la semana
Día 3 , Mes 13 , Año 5999
Octava Hour – Turno de guardia de la noche
( A Night hebreo Hour es 01:01:54 hoy )
( Duración de este Día hebreo: 24:00:45 )
Este reloj de tiempo en directo muestra el hebreo bíblico Hora actual en Jerusalem basado en la posición instantánea del sol, ya que sería visto allí. El área oscura representa la noche , y el área de la luz representa Day. Como disco movimientos del sol en un movimiento de las agujas del reloj , la corriente Hour hebreo se indica . Una hora hebrea termina y otra hora hebreo comienza en el momento en que el centro del disco solar cruza una línea de hora . Las vigilias de la noche para la Era del Mesías también se muestran .

La Torá , los Profetas y los Escritos no suman Horas hebreas específicos. Sólo las Escrituras mesiánicas horas número hebreas específicos en Mateo, Marcos , Lucas y Hechos. La tercera hora del día se refiere en Mateo 20:3-4 , Marcos 15:25 y Hechos 2:15. La tercera hora de la noche se hace referencia en Hechos 23:23-24 . La sexta hora del día se refiere en Mateo 20:05 , 27:45 , Marcos 15:33 , Lucas 23:44 y Hechos 10:09 . La hora novena del día se refiere en Mateo 20:05 , 27:45 , 27:46 , Marcos 15:33 , 15:34 , Lucas 23:44 , Hechos 3:01 , Hechos 10:03 y Hechos 10 : 30-31 . La undécima hora del día se refiere en Mateo 20:06 y Mateo 20:09 .
Un día típico hebreo
One Day hebreo
Génesis 1:5 Elohim llamó a la luz Día, ya las tinieblas llamó Noche .
Y fue la tarde y fue la mañana – el primer día.
12 Horas
Juan 11:09 ¿No hay
12 horas en un día ?
primero
ver
segundo
ver
tercera
ver
cuarto
ver
puesta del sol
tarde
” Abrir y cerrar de ojos”
Noche Begins
salida del sol
mañana
puesta del sol
tarde
tarde
crepúsculo
” Abrir y cerrar de ojos”
Noche Begins
mañana
crepúsculo
Entre la
Tardes
בין הערבים
( Tarde Crepúsculo)
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
10
11
11
12
12
Medio día
Día Horas hebreo
De mitad de la noche
Horarios nocturnos hebreo
Un día hebreo consta de 12 horas de la noche en hebreo y 12 horas del día hebreo. El punto medio de las 12 horas de la noche en hebreo se llama mitad de la noche. El momento de la mitad de la noche se produce exactamente a medio camino entre la puesta y la salida del sol que separa la sexta y séptima Horarios nocturnos hebreo. El punto medio de las 12 Horas del Día hebreo se llama medio día . El momento de la mitad de los días se produce exactamente a medio camino entre la salida y la puesta del sol que separa el sexto y el séptimo Día Horas hebreo. Una manera fácil de medir Horas del Día es el uso de un reloj de sol equiangular marcado con 12 divisiones.
En el calendario de la creación , Horas hebreos comienzan al amanecer y al atardecer. Una hora hebrea que ocurren entre la puesta y la salida del sol se llama Hour Night hebreo. Una hora hebrea que ocurren entre el amanecer y la puesta del sol se llama Día Hora hebreo. Sunset ocurre y el First Watch comienza exactamente en el inicio de la primera Noche hebreo Hour. El segundo reloj comienza exactamente en el inicio de la cuarta Noche hebreo horas . Mediados de la noche se produce y el Turno de guardia comienza exactamente en el inicio de la séptima Noche hebreo horas . La cuarta vigilia comienza exactamente en el inicio de la décima noche hebreo horas , y termina al amanecer al final de la duodécima noche hebreo horas . Salida del sol es siempre exactamente en el comienzo de la primera hebreo Día horas . Medio día ocurre exactamente al final de la sexta hebreo Día Hora . Puesta de sol se produce exactamente al final de la duodécima hebreo Día Hora .

La duración de una hora hebrea varía según la temporada. Un Día Hora hebreo es más corto en duración durante el invierno cuando una Hour Night hebreo es de mayor duración . Un Día Hora hebreo es de mayor duración durante el verano cuando una Hour Night hebreo es de menor duración .
Un día corto hebreo en invierno
One Day hebreo
primero
ver
segundo
ver
tercera
ver
cuarto
ver
12 Horas
puesta del sol
tarde
salida del sol
mañana
puesta del sol
tarde
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
10
11
11
12
12
Medio día
Día Horas hebreo
De mitad de la noche
Horarios nocturnos hebreo
En este diagrama, un Día Hora hebreo es más corto en duración que la hora nocturna hebreo. Esto ocurre en invierno . Las horas del día son las más cortas en el día del solsticio de invierno.

A Long Day hebreo en verano
One Day hebreo
primero
ver
segundo
ver
tercera
ver
cuarto
ver
12 Horas
puesta del sol
tarde
salida del sol
mañana
puesta del sol
tarde
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
10
11
11
12
12
Medio día
Día Horas hebreo
De mitad de la noche
Horarios nocturnos hebreo
En este diagrama, un Día Hora hebreo es más largo en duración que la hora nocturna hebreo. Esto ocurre en verano . Las horas del día son las más largas en el día del solsticio de verano .
A diferencia de Mateo, Marcos, Lucas y Hechos , el libro de Juan , ya que ahora existe en los manuscritos griegos , números de horas de la medianoche, ya que los romanos hicieron . Pilato interrogó יהושע el Mesías en la hora sexta cómputo romano según Juan 19:14 , que es la duodécima noche hebreo horas . יהושע el Mesías se sentó en el pozo de Jacob en Sicar en la hora sexta cómputo romano después de un viaje agotador de acuerdo a Juan 04:06 , que es el duodécimo hebreo Día Hora . Un noble viajó la mejor parte de un día de Cana a Cafarnaúm y se reunió יהושע el Mesías en el cómputo romano séptima hora de acuerdo con en Juan 04:52 , que es la primera Noche hebreo horas . Los discípulos se acercaron al lugar יהושע el Mesías estaba quedando en el cómputo romano décima hora y se quedaron con él por el resto de ese día , según Juan 01:39 . La hora décima cómputo romano es el cuarto hebreo Día Hora .

Aunque algunos han afirmado que no hay pruebas históricas de que los romanos contaban las horas desde la medianoche , como prueba de hecho existe. Según Gayo Plinio Segundo , que vivió entre el 23 CE y 79 CE, las autoridades romanas contadas horas civiles de la medianoche.

Plinio el Viejo , Historia Natural 2:77 : . ” El mismo día de hoy los hombres han observado en varias maneras Los babilonios contar el período entre las dos salidas del sol , los atenienses de que entre dos puestas de sol , los umbros desde el mediodía hasta el mediodía , la gente común de todo el mundo desde el amanecer a la oscuridad , los sacerdotes romanos y las autoridades que fijan el día civil y también los egipcios e Hiparco , el período de medianoche a medianoche ” .
Hoy en día, el calendario gregoriano cuenta horas civiles de la medianoche similar a la forma en que los romanos hicieron .
Los relojes de la noche
En la Era de la Torá el tiempo entre la puesta y la salida del sol se dividió en tres relojes . El reloj de la noche es aludido por Moisés en el Salmo 90:4 .
Salmos 90:4 Porque mil años delante de tus ojos son como un día, cuando ya pasó , como una vigilia de la noche [ del reloj por la noche ] .
Este verso alude al hecho de que un día hebreo es pasado en el momento de la puesta del sol , cuando comienza el reloj por la noche. También alude al hecho de que un milenio termina y otro milenio comienza al atardecer , cuando comienza el reloj por la noche. El guardia de la medianoche de la noche se menciona una vez en Jueces 7:19 . La vigilia de la mañana se le conoce por Moisés en Éxodo 14:24 y también se menciona en 1 Samuel 11:11 .

En la época de la Edad del Mesías , el tiempo entre la puesta y la salida del sol se dividió en cuatro relojes. El segundo reloj y tercera vigilia son cada vez mencionan en Lucas 12:38 . La cuarta vigilia se menciona una vez en Mateo 14:25 y una vez en Marcos 06:48 como el tiempo en que el Mesías caminó sobre el agua .
Relojes Durante la Edad
One Day hebreo
Génesis 1:5 Elohim llamó a la luz Día, ya las tinieblas llamó Noche .
Y fue la tarde y fue la mañana – el primer día.
12 Horas
Juan 11:09 ¿No hay
12 horas en un día ?
Durante la Edad de Instrucción
tarde
ver
medio
ver
mañana
ver
primero
ver
segundo
ver
tercera
ver
cuarto
ver
Durante la Edad del Mesías
puesta del sol
tarde
” Abrir y cerrar de ojos”
Noche Begins
salida del sol
mañana
puesta del sol
tarde
tarde
crepúsculo
” Abrir y cerrar de ojos”
Noche Begins
mañana
crepúsculo
Entre la
Tardes
בין הערבים
( Tarde Crepúsculo)
1
1
2
2
3
3
4
4
5
5
6
6
7
7
8
8
9
9
10
10
11
11
12
12
Medio día
Día Horas hebreo
De mitad de la noche
Horarios nocturnos hebreo
Siempre hay 12 Horarios nocturnos hebreo y 12 horas del día de hebreo en un Día de hebreo. Este diagrama representa un día típico hebreo en el que la duración tanto de la noche y las horas del día son casi lo mismo. Esto ocurre dos veces al año en la época del equinoccio de otoño y el equinoccio de primavera .
Siempre hay exactamente 24 horas hebreas entre dos puestas de sol. Sin embargo , la duración del tiempo entre dos puestas de sol medidos en horas civiles , minutos y segundos cambia ligeramente a lo largo del año . La curva en el gráfico a continuación representa la diferencia de tiempo en segundos entre las 24 horas y 24 Horas civiles hebreos durante todo el año en Jerusalén. El área azul representa el período en 24 Horas hebreos son un poco más largo en duración que 24 horas civiles. El área púrpura representa el período en 24 Horas hebreos son un poco más corto en duración de 24 horas civiles. La duración de 24 horas hebreo en el día hebreo del equinoccio de primavera es 24:00:41 o 41 segundos de más de 24 horas civiles. La duración de 24 horas hebreo en el día hebreo del equinoccio de otoño es 23:58:41 o 79 segundos con menos de 24 horas civiles. Note que hay poca correlación entre la forma de la curva de variación de tiempo y los solsticios y los equinoccios de temporada .

La duración de un día hebreo
0
días
50
días
100
días
150
días
200
días
250
días
300
días
350
días

100 segundos
50 segundos
Diferencia horaria en
segundos entre
Día Hebrea de
24 Horas hebreas
y 24 horas civiles
0 segundos
-50 segundos
-100 segundos
invierno
solsticio
invierno
primavera
equinoccio
primavera
verano
solsticio
verano
caer
equinoccio
caer
Un día hebreo siempre tiene exactamente 24 horas hebreas. Un día civil, se compone de 24 horas civiles. Sin embargo, un día hebreo no siempre igual a 24 horas civiles. Puesto que un día el hebreo es el momento de una puesta de sol a la siguiente, su duración será diferente de 24 horas civiles debido a la diferencia de tiempo civil entre los dos tiempos de la puesta del sol . La curva de este gráfico representa la diferencia de tiempo en segundos entre un día Hebrea de 24 Horas hebreo y un día civil de las 24 horas civiles durante todo el año en Jerusalén.
Precisión de la salida del sol y puesta del sol
Los cálculos para la salida del sol y puesta del sol en torahcalendar.com se basan en ciertas suposiciones hechas en el modelado de la refracción atmosférica . Estos supuestos incluyen el uso de la latitud , longitud y altitud del Monte del Templo se encuentra en Jerusalén, usando una presión barométrica promedio anual de 1 010 milibares , y usando una temperatura del aire promedio anual de 19,4 ° C ( 66,9 ° F). Por lo tanto , todas las veces que aparecen en relación con la salida del sol o la puesta del sol que se muestran con una resolución en cuestión de segundos , se determinan sobre la base de estos supuestos del modelo refracción atmosférica.

Como afirma Jean Meeus en Algoritmos astronómica:

” Un cambio de temperatura de invierno a verano puede cambiar las horas de salida y puesta de sol por cerca de 20 segundos en las latitudes medias del hemisferio norte y el Medio-Sur . Del mismo modo, la observación de la salida del sol o puesta del sol sobre un rango de presiones barométricas conduce a una variación de una docena de segundo en el tiempo “.
Jean Meeus , Astronómica Algoritmos , segunda edición, p.101 .
” El efecto de la refracción [ atmosférica ] aumenta cuando la presión aumenta o cuando la temperatura [ aire ] disminuye . ” Jean Meeus , Astronómica Algoritmos , segunda edición, p.106 .
” Cerca del horizonte perturbaciones impredecibles de la atmósfera se vuelven bastante importante . Según investigaciones de Schaefer y Liller , la refracción en el horizonte fluctúa por 0,3 ° alrededor de un valor medio [ 34 minutos de arco ] normalmente , y en algunos casos aparentemente mucho más . .. hay que mencionar aquí que el dar salida o puesta de tiempos de un cuerpo celeste con mayor precisión que al minuto más próximo , no tiene sentido ” . Jean Meeus , Astronómica Algoritmos , segunda edición, p.107 .
Por estas razones, la salida del sol real observada y puesta del sol en Jerusalén pueden diferir hasta en un minuto, debido a las variaciones diarias de temperatura y presión barométrica. En invierno, cuando la temperatura es más fría , la salida del sol real puede ocurrir antes de los tiempos previstos. También, en un día cuando la presión barométrica es más alta, la salida del sol se puede producir antes. Presión a temperatura fría y de alta barométrica combina el trabajo de forma acumulativa en la causa de la salida del sol que se produzca antes de los tiempos previstos. Torahcalendar.com sólo muestra la salida del sol y puesta del sol al segundo más cercano para ilustrar mejor el paso del tiempo mientras que proporciona una simulación casi en tiempo real de estos eventos.

Share Button
  1. Esteban Israel says:

    No acertaron con esto de los 6000 años , y es porque aun falta cumplirse el ministerio de los 2 testigos del apocalipsis 11 y tambien la aparicion y derrota del anticristo ,por lo tanto aun faltan algunos años para que se cumplan los 6000 años , despues recien comenzara el milenio

Leave a Reply

Current day month ye@r *